Neuroborreliosis

Neurological Lyme Disease of the Brain & Central Nervous System

Neurological Lyme Disease

Dr. Sponaugle has acquired extensive brain expertise from treating thousands of patients with brain and neurological disorders. This greatly enhances his ability to treat Lyme Disease-induced brain dysfunction in neurological Lyme disease patients.

For this reason, Lyme-literate doctors often refer neurological Lyme disease patients to Sponaugle Wellness Institute. Dr. Sponaugle is extremely adept at treating Depression and Anxiety caused by Lyme disease and excessive antibiotic treatment.

Dr. Sponaugle believes that the brain of chronic late-stage Lyme disease patients is always affected by Lyme spirochetes. Many neurological Lyme patients suffer from more severe brain infections. They often suffer from the following symptoms:

  • Lyme Partial Complex Seizures
  • Ataxia
  • Dyscoordination
  • Unilateral neurological symptoms – such as Bell’s Palsy, facial twitching, one-sided arm or leg weakness, right or left foot drop, unilateral intentional tremors, or resting tremors.

How Do Lyme Disease Spirochetes Attack the Brain?

In worldwide MRI studies on patients who tested positive for Borrelia, antibodies in their spinal fluid have proven that spirochetes – which is the corkscrew-shaped bacterium causing Lyme Disease (called Borrelia Burgdorferi) – have a propensity to attack three regions of the brain (which modulate motor function):

  1. The Sensory Motor Strip
  2. The Cerebellum
  3. The Basal Ganglia.

The Basal Ganglia includes the three motor regions that control involuntary movement:

  1. The Caudate Nucleus
  2. The Lentiform Nucleus
  3. The Substantia Nigra (known as the Parkinson’s region).

Dr. Sponaugle uses PET-brain imaging to obtain more sophisticated data on these regions for treatment. Additionally, his PET-scan database now catalogs hundreds of Lyme Disease patients, which allows him to continuously improve treatment for the benefit of others.

The doctors at Sponaugle Wellness Institute use PET-brain imaging to obtain more sophisticated data on these regions for treatment. Additionally, our PET-scan database now catalogs hundreds of Lyme Disease patients, allowing us to continuously improve treatment for the benefit of others.

Through computerized calculation, PET scans provide numbers for more objective evaluation of brain activity. The PET-scan computer calculates glucose metabolism by brain region, and glucose metabolism correlates with electrical activity.

Our preference for treating Lyme Disease is to reduce the brain’s toxin load to ground zero, before commencing to kill protocols in Neurological Lyme Disease patients.

However, because the effective killing of Lyme spirochetes, Bartonella, Protomyxzoa, and other infectious organisms releases lipopolysaccharide (LPS) toxins from their cell walls, the brain becomes temporarily more toxic during treatment.

Dr. Sponaugle addresses this as part of treatment by clearing this toxic effect during brain scans, making it easier to evaluate and treat the brain regions that are under-active due to infection.

Brain Expertise Makes Lyme Treatment More Successful

Dr. Sponaugle is an expert on the human brain. This greatly enhances his ability to correct Lyme Disease-induced brain dysfunction, which also causes immune dysfunction. Dr. Sponaugle also treats Lyme Disease-induced Depression and Anxiety as part of patients' overall treatment.

Through computerized calculation, PET scans provide numbers for a more objective evaluation of brain activity. The PET-scan computer calculates glucose metabolism by brain region, and glucose metabolism correlates with electrical activity.

Dr. Sponaugle's preference for Lyme Disease Treatment is to reduce the brain’s toxin load to ground zero, before commencing to kill protocols in Neurological Lyme Disease patients.

However, because the effective killing of Lyme spirochetes, Bartonella, Protomyxzoa, and other infectious organisms releases lipopolysaccharide toxins from their cell walls, the brain becomes temporarily more toxic during treatment.

Dr. Sponaugle addresses this as part of treatment, by clearing this toxic effect during brain scans, which makes it easier to evaluate and treat the brain regions that are under-active due to infection.

Scroll to Top
Skip to content